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lisasimpsonbookclub:

Don’t be glum, Lisa! Why not re-read one of your favorite books?

lisasimpsonbookclub:

Don’t be glum, Lisa! Why not re-read one of your favorite books?

Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law

planetmoney:

usagov:

Today the Supreme Court released its decision on the health care law, National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius. 

Healthcare.gov has information about how the law affects you. You can read the law, learn about key features of the law, and see a timeline of what will change and when. Learn more about the health care law.

millionsmillions:

“The purpose of my acknowledgment of the existence of human sexuality in the novel was to make myself and my family (and probably the reader) as uncomfortable as possible…Speaking of which, instead of Otis Redding, I’m going to sing “My Humps.” Hold my beer, please.” - First time novelist Matt Dojny talks about his book The Festival of Earthly Delights over beer and questionable music.

millionsmillions:

“The purpose of my acknowledgment of the existence of human sexuality in the novel was to make myself and my family (and probably the reader) as uncomfortable as possible…Speaking of which, instead of Otis Redding, I’m going to sing “My Humps.” Hold my beer, please.” - First time novelist Matt Dojny talks about his book The Festival of Earthly Delights over beer and questionable music.

millionsmillions:

Congratulations to Robert K. Massie andAnne Enright, winners of the inaugural Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction for Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman and The Forgotten Waltz, respectively. Be sure to check out our interview with Enright

housingworksbookstore:

Designer Ben made this highly informative event ad for next Monday, July 9’s The Truth About Microloans: A Conversation About the Realities of Microfinance and thus is my favorite person today.

housingworksbookstore:

Designer Ben made this highly informative event ad for next Monday, July 9’s The Truth About Microloans: A Conversation About the Realities of Microfinance and thus is my favorite person today.

nypl:

Great photo from the NYPL’s Billy Rose Theatre Collection, via the library’s new Lunch Hour NYC Tumblr.
lunchhournyc:

Many know Nora Ephron as the writer and director of classic films like You’ve Got Mail, Sleepless in Seattle, and When Harry Met Sally. She was also a magnificent, witty writer outside of film, crafting stories published in newspapers, magazines, and novels. On Tuesday night, she passed away of pneumonia brought on by acute myeloid leukemia.
What you may not know about her is that she “was a foodie in the best way: driven not by snobbery but by the joy of discovery and eager not to one-up you with her latest bliss, but to share it with you, guide you toward it.” In this loving tribute to Nora’s foodie side (a side this intern found surprising), her friend Frank Burni writes:

Her sublime comic novel “Heartburn” is studded with recipes for dishes that are metaphors for sorrow, for lust, for comfort, for joy. Nora understood that nothing talked more loudly, or more eloquently, than food. Nothing better defined people.

If you would like a taste of her novels, you may find Heartburn and her last book, I Remember Nothing, and Other, at your local library.
Rest in peace, Nora.
Photo Credit: Billy Rose Theatre Collection

nypl:

Great photo from the NYPL’s Billy Rose Theatre Collection, via the library’s new Lunch Hour NYC Tumblr.

lunchhournyc:

Many know Nora Ephron as the writer and director of classic films like You’ve Got MailSleepless in Seattle, and When Harry Met Sally. She was also a magnificent, witty writer outside of film, crafting stories published in newspapers, magazines, and novels. On Tuesday night, she passed away of pneumonia brought on by acute myeloid leukemia.

What you may not know about her is that she “was a foodie in the best way: driven not by snobbery but by the joy of discovery and eager not to one-up you with her latest bliss, but to share it with you, guide you toward it.” In this loving tribute to Nora’s foodie side (a side this intern found surprising), her friend Frank Burni writes:

Her sublime comic novel “Heartburn” is studded with recipes for dishes that are metaphors for sorrow, for lust, for comfort, for joy. Nora understood that nothing talked more loudly, or more eloquently, than food. Nothing better defined people.

If you would like a taste of her novels, you may find Heartburn and her last book, I Remember Nothing, and Other, at your local library.

Rest in peace, Nora.

Photo Credit: Billy Rose Theatre Collection

wayneedwards77:

New York Public Library

merrybrides:

If your anything like me you probably love Pinterest and have boards full of wedding ideas and pretty things. Chances are that you’ve already created a board with all of your gift registry wishlist items. But there’s only one problem with Pinterest — how to share those items with all of your…

housingworksbookstore:

slaughterhouse90210:

“Only those who know the supremacy of the intellectual life—the life which has a seed of ennobling thought and purpose within—can understand the grief of one who falls from that serene activity into the absorbing soul-wasting struggle with worldly annoyances.”― George Eliot, Middlemarch

Maris is a genius.

housingworksbookstore:

slaughterhouse90210:

“Only those who know the supremacy of the intellectual life—the life which has a seed of ennobling thought and purpose within—can understand the grief of one who falls from that serene activity into the absorbing soul-wasting struggle with worldly annoyances.”
― George Eliot, Middlemarch

Maris is a genius.

…when at eve returning with thy car,
Awaiting heard the jingling bells from far;
Straight on the fire the sooty pot I plac’d,
To warm thy broth I burnt my hands in haste.
When hungry thou stood’st staring, like an oaf,
I slic’d the luncheon from the barley loaf;
With crumbled bread I thicken’d well the mess.
Ah! Love me more, or love thy pottage less!

Part of the poem “The Shepard’s Week” by John Gay (1685-1732). This use of the word “luncheon” is cited in dictionary definitions of the word “lunch,” including those by Webster and Johnson. A “lunch” or “luncheon” used to mean a chunk, a piece - something you could hold in your hand - and which was eaten any time of day as a snack.

Click the link to read the rest of the long poem, which is quite funny in parts, in a digitized version of the book published in 1871 and donated to the Harvard University Library by Gay’s nephew.

For more lunch tidbits, come see Lunch NYC, our new exhibition!

(via nypl)